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Israel’s future as an anachronism

Israel’s future as an anachronism

Israel is a nineteenth century European project completed neither in the nineteenth century nor in Europe.

The former Yugoslavia – independence and the fate of minorities – part eleven

The former Yugoslavia – independence and the fate of minorities – part eleven

TransConflict is pleased to present the eleventh part of a chapter of “Confronting the Yugoslav controversies – a scholars’ initiative”, entitled “Independence and the Fate of Minorities (1991-1992).”

Central African Republic – Muslims and Christians in Bangui at peace amidst war

Central African Republic – Muslims and Christians in Bangui at peace amidst war

Even as violence in the Central African Republic escalates, there are local communities showing that peace is still possible, with grassroots peace initiatives challenging and rejecting violence.

Basque Country – definitive cessation of ETA’s armed activity

Basque Country – definitive cessation of ETA’s armed activity

Emeritus Archbishop and Noble Peace Prize winner, Desmond Tutu, welcomed ETA’s decision to start the process of disarmament, because it “opens the door to a lasting peace”.

Genocide and justice – where now?

Genocide and justice – where now?

Two decades after the Rwanda genocide, the promised hopes of international accountability for such crimes is in trouble, with a number of ingredients of a crisis that is both legal and political.

Peacebuilding and human rights – an agenda for democratic transformation

Peacebuilding and human rights – an agenda for democratic transformation

The democratic transformation requires a change in thinking at each level of society in post-conflict nations. There must be a shift from intervention to deescalate conflict towards conflict resolution and reconciliation.

The former Yugoslavia – independence and the fate of minorities – part ten

The former Yugoslavia – independence and the fate of minorities – part ten

TransConflict is pleased to present the tenth part of a chapter of “Confronting the Yugoslav controversies – a scholars’ initiative”, entitled “Independence and the Fate of Minorities (1991-1992).”

Discovering the commons in Turkey – conflict as a means of transcending societal divides

Discovering the commons in Turkey – conflict as a means of transcending societal divides

The Gezi events showed that new social movements have a significant potential to act as a forum for dialogue and unite different segments of the society under the commons; demonstrating how a conflict itself may actually be a means for transcending societal divides and moving towards social cohesion.

Discovering the commons in Turkey – new media, social movements and social cohesion

Discovering the commons in Turkey – new media, social movements and social cohesion

The Resistance has been a turning point in enabling society to develop a new understanding of itself: as a society that is open to all. It was not the representatives of various classes or ideologies on the streets; it was the people – even those without an established ideology – […]

March 2014 Review

March 2014 Review

TransConflict is pleased to present a selection of articles published during March, plus updates from the Global Coalition for Conflict Transformation. 

What do the local election results whisper about the future of Turkish democracy?

What do the local election results whisper about the future of Turkish democracy?

Local election results confirmed that Turkey is going through a belated, yet organic democratic transition. In absence of Turkish military’s looming shadow, the liberals and social democrats are learning to own the process rather than merely follow.

The former Yugoslavia – independence and the fate of minorities – part nine

The former Yugoslavia – independence and the fate of minorities – part nine

TransConflict is pleased to present the ninth part of a chapter of “Confronting the Yugoslav controversies – a scholars’ initiative”, entitled “Independence and the Fate of Minorities (1991-1992).”

Closed borders, open minds?

Closed borders, open minds?

Though civil society has played a key role in promoting dialogue between non-state actors in Turkey and Armenia, the border issue makes things very difficult.

Umuganda – a tool for reconciliation in Rwanda

Umuganda – a tool for reconciliation in Rwanda

The concept of ‘Umuganda’ – which means ‘coming together in common purpose’ – is to promote unity and reconciliation in a society that has been devastated by conflict, genocide and poverty.

Borders of war – the impact of South Ossetia’s new border

Borders of war – the impact of South Ossetia’s new border

The installation of a 400-kilometre security fence along the Georgian-South Ossetian border has had a huge impact on the lives of local people.

Ukraine – a stake for the long run

Ukraine – a stake for the long run

The West is stuck in reactive mode to what it perceives as a Crimean crisis; it needs instead to prepare for a strategic competition with Russia of unforeseeable duration for influence over Ukraine.

The former Yugoslavia – independence and the fate of minorities – part eight

The former Yugoslavia – independence and the fate of minorities – part eight

TransConflict is pleased to present the eighth part of a chapter of “Confronting the Yugoslav controversies – a scholars’ initiative”, entitled “Independence and the Fate of Minorities (1991-1992).”

Negotiating the Syrian crisis – a compromise remains far off

Negotiating the Syrian crisis – a compromise remains far off

The trajectory of the Geneva II negotiations – either towards convergence (resolution) or divergence (non-resolution) – will affect the outcome of one of the most violent and protracted conflicts in the Middle East.

Bosnia and Herzegovina – acknowledging the crimes of the past

Bosnia and Herzegovina – acknowledging the crimes of the past

Acknowledging the crimes of the past is a difficult but vital step to build lasting peace. Old wounds can easily be reopened by discussing history, but in order for them to heal properly history must be confronted.

Lest we forget – the foundations of peace in Rwanda

Lest we forget – the foundations of peace in Rwanda

The collective acknowledgement of the past not only clears up misunderstandings, it also liberates us from the tyranny of widespread, existing popular prejudices. In order for reconciliation to take root in political and moral quarrels, there is first a need for truth, then justice and finally forgiveness.

Is transitional justice a forgotten issue in Afghanistan?

Is transitional justice a forgotten issue in Afghanistan?

Thirty years of conflict has left a history of war crimes, human rights abuses, and atrocities, for which many victims have never received justice.

The former Yugoslavia – independence and the fate of minorities – part seven

The former Yugoslavia – independence and the fate of minorities – part seven

TransConflict is pleased to present the seventh part of a chapter of “Confronting the Yugoslav controversies – a scholars’ initiative”, entitled “Independence and the Fate of Minorities (1991-1992).”

The merits and pitfalls of comparison – Ukraine, Crimea and the Yugoslav references

The merits and pitfalls of comparison – Ukraine, Crimea and the Yugoslav references

Stating that a democratic Ukraine that fulfills the EU membership criteria can become a member,if it so desired, can provide for a strong incentive for change within and would be an appropriate acknowledgement of the risks the protesters took in recent months in Kiev and elsewhere.

Rwanda – building an engaged youth twenty years after genocide

Rwanda – building an engaged youth twenty years after genocide

Rwanda is still in need of healing and reconciliation, and the Rwandan youth still need to reflect on lessons learned from the past in order to construct the future they want and deserve.

The Omani experiment

The Omani experiment

The Oman of Sultan Qaboos represents a case study of modernization and political development initiated from the top. But unlike the case of Kemal’s Turkey, the changes have come incrementally and at a very slow pace.