Kenya

Though Kenya’s complicated tribal structure contribute to its multi-ethnic diversity and richness, the marginalization of particular minorities and indigenous groups – in terms of both resources and recognition – is one of the key challenges for conflict transformation.

Suggested Reading Conflict Background Articles

GCCT Members from Kenya

1) Act Change Transform (ACT)

Act Change Transform (ACT) works with others for positive change focusing on four thematic areas a) peacebuilding and Conflict Transformation; b) democracy and governance; c) women’s empowerment; and d) environment and natural resource management. ACT’s methodololgy entails capacity development through small grants, so it manage grants on behalf of donors. Read more…

 

2) Active Non-Violence Initiatives Kenya

Active Non-Violence Initiatives Kenya contribute to conflict transformation through research, training, advocacy and promoting active-nonviolence. Read more…

 

3) Africa Health and Development International (AHADI)

Africa Health and Development International (AHADI) promotes health, good governance, and better quality of life for all, specifically amongst the poor and disadvantaged in Africa, through communication for behavioural change and policy advocacy. AHADI provides trainings on conflict mitigation, diversity, leadership, non-violence and conflict sensitive journalism, with a particular focus on youth. Read more…

 

4) Africa Peace Forum

The Africa Peace Forum (APFO) is an independent, not-for-profit non-governmental organization registered in and based in Nairobi, Kenya. It facilitates research and advocacy on areas of peace and security at national, regional and international level. Read more…

 

5) Seeds of Peace Africa (SOPA)

SOPA International was founded by protagonists of peace, committed to bringing positive change through non-violence and the use of effective interpersonal skills as a means of solving conflict and achieving peaceful coexistence in which children, youth and women are empowered to realize their full potential by participating in building positive peace, sustainable development and respect for human dignity as the pillars for a just society. Read more…

This graffiti, found throughout the slum of Kibera, was put up during the post election violence in 2008. The artist, who calls himself solo7, while others were killing, looting, and rioting, risked his life to write these messages of peace. (Photograph by the Advocacy Project, published under a Creative Commons license).

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